Educational Articles

Dogs + Tumors

  • These notes are provided to help you understand the diagnosis or possible diagnosis of cancer in your pet. For general information on cancer in pets ask for our handout "What is Cancer". Your veterinarian may suggest certain tests to help confirm or eliminate the diagnosis, and to help assess treatment options and likely outcomes.

  • Endocrine glands produce specialized chemicals called "hormones". These regulate and integrate many activities to maintain internal stability of the body.

  • Endocrine glands produce specialized chemicals called “hormones”. These regulate and integrate many activities to maintain internal stability of the body. The hormones pass directly into the blood to affect target cells elsewhere.

  • Dogs and cats have a pair of anal sacs, one located on each side of the anus between the external and internal anal sphincter muscles. The sacs are lined with modified sweat glands called anal glands.

  • Non-cancerous bone tumors are rare and mainly due to abnormal development. They include bone cysts and single or multiple lumps of bone in abnormal places (exostoses).

  • The bone marrow is the soft tissue inside the bones. Before birth, the marrow contains the primary (stem) cells that from all the red and white blood cells. After birth, some types of blood cells, particularly lymphocytes, are made in other parts of the body.

  • Calcium deposits in the skin have a variety of causes. The deposits are usually of minor significance in the young but may indicate serious disease in some older animals

  • As continuous improvements in our knowledge and new and evolving methods of treatment are developed, pet owners and their veterinarians have more options available when cancer is diagnosed.

  • All tissues and organs of the body may develop cancer (an abnormal overgrowth of their constituent cells). Every organ (liver, lungs, spleen, kidneys and so on) contains a supporting framework of fibrous connective tissue as well as nerves to relay information to and from the brain.

  • Systemic lymphoma is a very common cancer in dogs, but the cutaneous form is actually quite rare. Current statistics suggest that cutaneous lymphoma accounts for only about 5% of canine lymphoma cases.

Location Hours
Monday7:30am – 7:30pm
Tuesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Wednesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Thursday7:30am – 7:30pm
Friday7:30am – 7:30pm
Saturday8:00am – 4:00pm
Sunday5:00pm – 6:00pm

The telephone number at the Emergency Veterinary Clinic is 905-495-9907.