Educational Articles

Dogs + Care & Wellness

  • Happy, sunny, and feisty as all get-out, the Australian Terrier knows he has serious work to do: chase anything that moves, bark at anything that approaches, and keep you in stitches.

  • Azodyl is a nutritional supplement that may decrease azotemia, a condition in which there is too much nitrogen—in the form of urea, creatinine, and other waste products—in the blood. Azotemia occurs in both dogs and cats that have chronic kidney disease (CKD). In theory, Azodyl works by adding nitrogen-consuming bacteria into the intestines. Azodyl should be considered an adjunct (secondary) treatment for CKD.

  • The Basenji may be the most un-doglike dog on our planet. He does not bark, cleans himself in a manner similar to that of a cat, is a good climber, and is relatively independent.

  • Despite its droopy visage, the joyful Basset Hound is a good-natured, loving dog that plays well with children and is happy most of the time with everyone in its family, including the cat.

  • The Beagle is a sociable, easy-going individual who enjoys meeting anyone and everyone – especially children and other dogs. That said, the breed does have an independent streak, and any self-respecting Beagle is inevitably at the mercy of his nose.

  • The Bearded Collie just loves life. He is an active, shaggy dog with an effervescent personality, always ready to join his people in any activity.

  • The Beauceron is alert, courageous, and loyal, making him an ideal family guardian. He's also eager to please and extremely intelligent, gifted at any task involving learning, memory, and reasoning.

  • Anyone can see why the Bedlington Terrier is called the "little lamb dog." That gentle manner, that lamb-soft coat, those tasseled ears... adorably affectionate and sweet, the Bedlington is the perfect combination of a loving and devoted family pet and a fiery, brave-hearted terrier that can run like the wind on the hunt or defend himself with lion-like courage if provoked.

  • As dogs age, we generally see changes in their behavior. The playful ball-chasing and constant running around that we associate with puppies gives way to adult dogs napping in the sun and lounging during evening TV time. And with senior dogs, we accept even more slowing down.

  • There are numerous products on the market that have been designed to help prevent undesirable behavior in dogs. Leashes, harnesses, and head halters are needed to keep pets under control, especially when outdoors.

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The telephone number at the Emergency Veterinary Clinic is 905-495-9907.