Educational Articles

Cats + Care & Wellness

  • The general condition of your cat's skin and coat are good indicators of its health. A healthy coat should be shiny and smooth, not coarse or brittle, and healthy skin should be supple and clear, not greasy, flaky or bumpy.

  • Weight loss is tough for anyone - two- or four-legged! However, losing weight and getting in shape can add not only years to your cat's life; it can also make those extra years more enjoyable. Helping your furry feline to shed a few pounds may be easier than you think.

  • An overview of the rules regulating cat food labeling, in order to better understand and interpret the information they contain.

  • If you think your veterinary health care providers are speaking a foreign language, you are not alone. If you don’t quite grasp everything you hear or read, don’t feel like you’re illiterate. Deciphering “medicalese” can be tough!

  • What is declawing? Why is it controversial? What are the alternatives? Let's discuss the controversial subject of declawing with the overall wellbeing of our feline friends as a top priority.

  • A joint connects two or more bones together. Most joints in the body are mobile, allowing the bones to move in relationship to each other. The vast majority of moveable joints are held together by an outer layer of tough fibrous tissue called the "joint capsule".

  • Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen by veterinarians. Approximately two-thirds of cats over three years of age have some degree of dental disease. The most common problems are due to periodontal disease, gingivitis and cervical neck lesions, also called oral resorptive lesions.

  • Even though e-cigarettes may be safer for humans than using traditional tobacco products, they are certainly not safe for pets. The nicotine associated with e-cigarettes, even without the tobacco, poses a serious health threat for dogs and cats.

  • Many liquid potpourri products and essential oils, including oil of cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, tea tree (melaleuca), wintergreen, and ylang ylang, are poisonous to cats. Both ingestion and skin exposure can be toxic.

  • Our culture has evolved to embrace the human-animal bond with love and respect. Our cats are members of the family, and many of us describe ourselves as “pet parents.”

Location Hours
Monday7:30am – 7:30pm
Tuesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Wednesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Thursday7:30am – 7:30pm
Friday7:30am – 7:30pm
Saturday8:00am – 4:00pm
Sunday5:00pm – 6:00pm

The telephone number at the Emergency Veterinary Clinic is 905-495-9907.