Educational Articles

Cats + Medical Conditions

  • Maropitant is a medication (technically a neurokinin receptor antagonist) that makes stimulation of the vomit center extremely difficult. In dogs 16 weeks and older, it is used to prevent vomiting due to motion sickness and to prevent acute vomiting which may be associated with many illnesses.

  • Mastitis is a term used to describe inflammation of a mammary gland (breast). In most cases, mastitis is caused by a bacterial infection.

  • The gastrointestinal tract terminates in the large intestine with a tubular organ called the colon. The colon serves as a site for the absorption of water and storage of fecal material; it ends at the rectum. The walls of the colon contain muscles that are stimulated to contract by nerves from the spinal cord. When the colon contracts, fecal material is pushed out of the body.

  • Megaesophagus is not a single disease. Instead it is considered a combination disorder in which the esophagus (the tube that carries food and liquid between the mouth and stomach) dilates and loses motility (its ability to move food into the stomach). When esophageal motility is decreased or absent, food and liquid accumulate in the esophagus.

  • Motion sickness in cats is a common problem. Unlike many dogs that can be “trained” to comfortably ride in cars, cats prove much more challenging to overcome their anxiety. Most motion sickness cases in cats are caused primarily by the stress and anxiety associated with travel. Cats that travel only once or twice a year (typically when visiting the veterinarian) aren’t used to car rides and often associate the car ride with the stressful experience that follows. This reaction can result in motion sickness.

  • Epistaxis is defined as acute hemorrhage from the nostril, nasal cavity, or nasopharynx. It is commonly referred to as a "nosebleed." Epistaxis in cats can be extremely unsettling for the pet owner. Most acute or sudden nosebleeds are caused by simple trauma or by upper respiratory tract infections.

  • Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the most common kidney-based disease in cats. Waste products are normally filtered out of the blood by the kidneys and excreted in the urine, but cats with CKD will end up with an accumulation of these waste products in the bloodstream as the filtering process breaks down. CKD occurs on a spectrum, progressing through four stages with each subsequent stage reflecting a more severe phase of the disease than the last.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. It is one of the most common chronic diseases that affect cats. By some estimates, 90% of cats over 10 years of age are affected by OA.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. Although dramatically underrecognized, it is actually one of the most common chronic diseases of cats. One study at a veterinary teaching hospital suggested that more than 90% of cats over 10 years of age have radiographic evidence of OA.

  • Ovarian remnant syndrome is a condition that occurs when ovarian tissue remains inside the body after a female cat is spayed. This tissue can produce estrogen, triggering signs of heat in the cat.

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The telephone number at the Emergency Veterinary Clinic is 905-495-9907.