Educational Articles

Cats + Medications

  • Ketoconazole is an antifungal medication used to treat fungal infections in your pet. Your veterinarian may prescribe this medication for other conditions, such as Cushing’s disease in dogs. It may also be prescribed with cyclosporin to decrease the elimination of cyclosporin.

  • Ketoprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication used to reduce pain caused by inflammation. It may also be used to decrease fever.

  • Ketorolac is a topical preparation used to stop inflammation in the eye.

  • L-Carnitine is an amino acid derivative. It is synthesized from methionine and lysine. The body requires L-carnitine for energy metabolism. This medication has been used as adjunctive therapy for dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy. Other uses include protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy and reduction of the risk of damage to the myocardium due to interruption of the blood supply to this area. L-carnitine has been used in cats as adjunctive therapy to facilitate metabolism of liver fat.

  • Lactulose may be used as a stool softener to treat constipation. In liver disease it may also be used to reduce the level of ammonia in the blood. This will help prevent hepatic encephalopathy, which is a condition associated with cirrhosis of the liver.

  • Latanaprost is used to reduce the pressure in the eye caused by glaucoma.

  • Levothyroxine is used to treat low thyroid levels. This medication belongs to the general group of medicines called hormones. It is used when the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone.

  • Lincomycin is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections. This medication may be used to treat upper respiratory infections, skin infections, inflammation of the kidneys and inflammation of the uterus.

  • Lomustine is used to treat lymphoma and tumors of the central nervous system in dogs and cats. It may be used to treat other forms of cancer as well.

  • Loperamide is used to help manage diarrhea in dogs. It helps stop diarrhea by slowing down motility (movement) in the intestines. Loperamide has also been used to treat acute colitis and malabsorption/maldigestion.

Location Hours
Monday7:30am – 7:30pm
Tuesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Wednesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Thursday7:30am – 7:30pm
Friday7:30am – 7:30pm
Saturday8:00am – 4:00pm
Sunday5:00pm – 6:00pm

The telephone number at the Emergency Veterinary Clinic is 905-495-9907.