Educational Articles

Cats + Medications

  • Stanozolol is an anabolic steroid. It has been prescribed to improve appetite, promote weight gain, and/or to increase muscle strength and vitality in dogs, cats and horses. It may also be used to treat anemia.

  • Sucralfate is used to treat oral, esophageal, gastric and duodenal ulcers. It may also be used to prevent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory induced ulceration. This medication forms a barrier over the ulcer, which protects the ulcer from the acid of the stomach and allows it to heal.

  • Sulfamethoxazole / trimethoprim is an antibiotic combination used to prevent and treat infections.

  • Sulfasalazine is used to treat inflammatory bowel disease in dogs and cats. Sulfasalazine works inside the bowel by helping to reduce the inflammation and other symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.

  • Tacrolimus is used to stimulate tear production and it is used in dogs to treat keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS or dry eye syndrome). It may be supplied as an eye ointment or an eye drop.

  • Taurine is an amino acid used to treat cardiomyopathy due to a taurine deficiency in cats and dogs. Taurine has also been used to prevent retinal degeneration.

  • Tetracycline is an antibiotic. This medication has been prescribed for your pet to treat a bacterial infection.

  • A brand name medication is the first of its kind and gets to “brand the name”. However, there may be differences between brand name and generic drugs. Although the active ingredient must be the same as the original drug, generics may include different inactive ingredients such as preservatives or fillers.

  • Tramadol is a synthetic mu-receptor opiate agonist. It is used to relieve severe pain.

  • Transdermal means the application of a medicine or drug through the skin. In the simplest terms, a drug is placed on top of the skin, where it is absorbed into the bloodstream. Transdermal medications have many advantages, chief among them ease of application. Medications that can be absorbed through the skin bypass the need for pills or liquids, which can be a challenge to administer to some pets.

Location Hours
Monday7:30am – 7:30pm
Tuesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Wednesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Thursday7:30am – 7:30pm
Friday7:30am – 7:30pm
Saturday8:00am – 4:00pm
Sunday5:00pm – 6:00pm

The telephone number at the Emergency Veterinary Clinic is 905-495-9907.