Educational Articles

Emergency Situations

  • Ferrets have several unique problems; understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care problems.

  • Reproductive disease in ferrets is rare today, as most pet ferrets are spayed or neutered at a young age. One disease still seen occasionally in pet ferrets occurs in females that are not spayed.

  • When it comes to bleeding, what you can’t see can be more serious than what you can see. Visible bleeding from a broken nail or cut ear looks scary and makes a terrible mess, but internal bleeding in the chest or abdomen that you can’t see is much more dangerous.

  • When it comes to bleeding, what you can’t see can be more serious than what you can. To minimize blood loss, you can provide first aid for bleeding dogs until you arrive at the veterinarian.

  • Emergencies come in all forms; automobile accidents, bite wounds, burns, heatstroke, poisoning, seizures, and more. For a general overview of what constitutes an emergency, and how to handle common crisis situations, refer to our fact sheet on Common Emergencies in Dogs.

  • Dogs that fall from heights can suffer sprains, broken bones, head trauma, and chest or abdominal injuries. Small dogs can incur the same degree of injury falling from much smaller distances. Toy breeds have been known to break one or both legs when simply jumping down from the sofa.

  • Cats are nosy creatures, sniffing at anything of interest. Since felines find insects interesting, they sniff at them, and if they stick their nose where it doesn’t belong, they may get a quick reprimand that could be fatal.

  • The stings of bees, wasps, and hornets, and the bites of ants and spiders all spell trouble for the nosy dog. Insect venom causes problems ranging from mild irritation to life-threatening shock.

  • Although most limps need veterinary attention, there are a few first aid measures you can perform at home if your dog is hobbling around.

  • Medical emergencies occur suddenly and without warning. It is important for all cat owners to have a basic understanding of common veterinary medical emergencies and basic first aid for their pet. While no one can be prepared for all emergencies, there are some simple guidelines you should follow and things to look for if your cat seems ill or involved in an accident.

Location Hours
Monday7:30am – 7:30pm
Tuesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Wednesday7:30am – 7:30pm
Thursday7:30am – 7:30pm
Friday7:30am – 7:30pm
Saturday8:00am – 4:00pm
Sunday5:00pm – 6:00pm

The telephone number at the Emergency Veterinary Clinic is 905-495-9907.