Educational Articles

Dogs + Treatment

  • The easiest way to give your dog a liquid medication is to use a treat specially designed for this purpose or mix it with some canned food. To ensure your dog swallows the medication, it is best to hand feed the medicated food or treat, rather than mixing it into a large portion that the dog may not completely consume.

  • The easiest way to give your dog a pill is to hide the pill in food. This usually works best if you hide it in a special treat such as a small amount of canned dog food, peanut butter or cottage cheese. To ensure that your dog swallows the pill, you should hand feed the medicated piece of food or treat rather than offering it in a large portion that the dog may not completely consume.

  • Penetrating trauma typically refers to a deep wound that enters a body cavity such as the abdomen or chest. Most injuries are caused by traumas such as gunshot or arrow wounds, animal fights, impalement on sticks or metal, and automobile accidents. Falls from high places may also result in serious penetrating injuries.

  • Heartworm disease or dirofilariasis is a serious and potentially fatal disease. It is caused by a blood-borne parasite known as Dirofilaria immitis. Treatment usually consists of several parts including an injectable drug to kill adult heartworms, antibiotics, and treatment to kill microfilaria. There is some risk involved in treating dogs with heartworms, although fatalities are rare.

  • A diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) in your dog can feel devastating and even overwhelming. After all, we know that OA is a progressive, degenerative disease that will worsen over time. By most estimates, 20% of all dogs (regardless of age) are affected by OA, making it the most common chronic disease they face. Once a dog is diagnosed with OA, it is important to understand that our focus is management rather than cure. Success means maximizing your dog’s comfort and function while minimizing pain.

  • Providing hospice care for pets as they approach their end of life is a relatively young discipline within veterinary medicine. Although the foundational principles of veterinary hospice care are derived fairly directly from those of human hospice care, there are some critical differences between providing hospice care to a human family member and providing hospice care to an animal family member.

  • Hospice care for pets is an emerging niche of veterinary medicine that creates and relies on a unique caring collaboration between the pet owner and members of the veterinary healthcare team. Pet hospice is patterned after the delivery of the end-of-life care provided for human patients, with the additional provision from the veterinarian for humane euthanasia when the pet’s day-to-day quality of life becomes unacceptable.

  • Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID and is used to treat fever, pain, and inflammation in humans. Ibuprofen poisoning occurs when a dog ingests a toxic dose of ibuprofen, either through misuse or by accident. Most commonly in dogs, clinical signs related to irritation and ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract are observed including decreased appetite, vomiting (sometimes with blood), diarrhea, depression, abdominal pain, dark tarry stools, and bloody stools.

  • Ear cleaning is a very important part of your dog’s grooming needs. Some dogs need more frequent ear cleaning than others. Dogs who are prone to ear infections often benefit from more frequent ear cleanings. Cleaning your dog’s ears does not require any special equipment. Your veterinarian can help you decide how often your dog’s ears should be cleaned.

  • Kennel cough is a broad term covering any infectious or contagious condition of dogs where coughing is one of the major clinical signs. It is also referred to as infectious tracheobronchitis. Several viruses and bacteria can cause kennel cough, often at the same time. Because the infection spreads when dogs are housed together, it is often seen soon after dogs have been in kennels, hence the name 'kennel cough'.