Educational Articles

Cats + Care & Wellness

  • When your cat is being treated for an illness, it is very important that you follow your veterinarian's advice and instructions precisely. Take your cat for re-examination if and when requested. If your cat's condition worsens unexpectedly, contact your veterinarian for advice.

  • Sedatives are prescription medications that should only be administered to healthy animals. If your cat's veterinary appointment is for a routine wellness examination, your veterinarian may prescribe a sedative if your cat's stress is severe.

  • The purpose of the microchips used for pets is to provide a form of permanent identification. These microchip implants are called RFID tags, (Radio Frequency Identification). They are tiny, virtually painless to implant, and dramatically increase the odds that a lost cat will be returned to his family.

  • If you are moving with a cat, there are some things to consider to reduce her anxiety, minimize problems, and help her settle in. Before you move, make sure she has adequate identification (a collar or microchip). Make the move to your new home with your cat in a safe, well-secured container, such as a cat carrier, to avoid danger of escape. On arrival at your new home, leave her in her carrier until a room has been unpacked and set up with familiar objects and furniture. Then make this 'her' room for the initial adjustment period. Cats are very territorial and may be reluctant to accept a new environment as their home. There are things you can do to help them settle in and see their home as 'home.' Give your cat lots of extra attention and petting during this adjustment period.

  • Neutering and castration are the common terms used to describe the surgical procedure known scientifically as orchidectomy or orchiectomy during which both testicles are removed in order to sterilize a male cat. Neutering is recommended to prevent urine marking and other territorial behavior including roaming and fighting with other cats that increases the risk of contracting disease. This procedure is recommended to be performed around 6 months of age when puberty is beginning. No adverse effects are noted following neutering; however it is important to remember that metabolism does decrease after the procedure, so diet will need to be adjusted accordingly to prevent inappropriate weight gain.

  • Osteoarthritis is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. It is one of the most common chronic diseases that affect cats. By some estimates, 90% of cats over the age of 10 are affected by OA. Nutraceuticals are food or food products that reportedly produce health benefits. Nutraceuticals that are beneficial in cats with osteoarthritis include omega 3 fatty acids, microlactin, and ASU. It is important to discuss supplement use with your veterinarian to determine the best ones for your cat.

  • Obesity is the most common preventable disease in cats affecting up to 50% of the North American cat population. Obesity contributes to disease including diabetes, arthritis, hypertension, and cancer causing a decreased lifespan. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise plans. Regular visits to the veterinarian for body condition assessment and weight checks are crucial to weight loss as is maintaining the recommended dietary intake.

  • Obesity is a very common problem in cats and leads to many health problems, including an increased risk of diabetes mellitus, heart disease and many types of cancer. Extra body fat causes increased inflammation in the body, worsening osteoarthritis. If there is already evidence of osteoarthritis, reducing inflammation and pain will help encourage your cat to become more active, which will speed up appropriate weight loss. Obesity can be prevented or reversed by being aware of calorie intake, body condition, and exercise.

  • Obesity is a very common problem in cats due to too many calories in and not enough calories burned. Extra body fat causes increased inflammation in the body, worsening osteoarthritis. To prevent your cat from becoming obese, speak to your veterinarian about appropriate food for your cat's particular life stage. Including exercise in your cat's daily routine can help prevent or reverse obesity. Be aware or your cat's body condition and keep track of her weight.

  • As all cat owners know, cats are NOT small dogs! And when it comes to pain and pain management, this is certainly true. Fortunately for cats and the people who love them, veterinarians have made excellent progress in understanding cat pain and how to manage it.