Educational Articles

Cats + Care & Wellness

  • Pet health registries provide answers for many interested pet owners by gathering, organizing, analyzing, centralizing, and disseminating large amounts of information on a very many dogs and cats. This valuable information increases our understanding of health issues and facilitates research into animal disease.

  • Senior cats need extra care and monitoring to ensure they are enjoying a good quality of life. As cats age, many chronic diseases can develop that can be managed quite well if they are diagnosed and treated early. The best care is achieved through a cooperative relationship between the pet owner and veterinary team.

  • It is estimated that 90% of cats over age 10 are affected by osteoarthritis, making it the most common chronic disease cats face. It is important to develop a plan with your veterinarian to help your cat maintain a good quality of life despite her arthritis. Arthritis management plans include weight loss, exercise, medications, diet, supplements, and modification of the home environment to ease your cat’s daily activities.

  • While the holidays bring more challenges to the already difficult winter months, we can't forget about indoor and outdoor toxins frequently seen at this time of year. Keeping your pets healthy and safe will help keep the holidays stress free.

  • Did you know that you can help your veterinarian treat your pet's heart disease by counting their breathing rate at home, and watching for other clues that your pet is not doing as well as you think? Using simple techniques, you can learn how to become an invaluable part of your pet's healthcare team.

  • Providing hospice care for pets as they approach their end of life is a relatively young discipline within veterinary medicine. Although the foundational principles of veterinary hospice care are derived fairly directly from those of human hospice care, there are some critical differences between providing hospice care to a human family member and providing hospice care to an animal family member.

  • Hospice care for pets is an emerging niche of veterinary medicine that creates and relies on a unique caring collaboration between the pet owner and members of the veterinary healthcare team. Pet hospice is patterned after the delivery of the end-of-life care provided for human patients, with the additional provision from the veterinarian for humane euthanasia when the pet's day-to-day quality of life becomes unacceptable.

  • Many think that because cats are finicky eaters they are poisoned less often than dogs. However, with their curiosity and fastidious grooming, intoxication is, unfortunately, not uncommon. Several factors predispose cats to becoming ill once they have been exposed to even a small amount of a poisonous substance.

  • Recognizing and treating pain in cats has evolved dramatically over time. We understand that because cats are living longer and longer, they are also experiencing the deterioration and debilitation that go along with aging. Pain cannot be treated unless and until it is unmasked.

  • Medicated shampoos may be prescribed for a variety of skin conditions. These baths should be performed in an area that is comfortably warm, using lukewarm water. Medicated shampoo should be applied to a clean, wet coat, so start out by thoroughly rinsing your cat with lukewarm water. Shampoo should be worked into the coat thoroughly and allowed to sit for 10 minutes prior to rinsing, unless directed otherwise by your veterinarian.