Educational Articles

Cats + Care & Wellness

  • Ownerless cats may look the same, but there is a difference between stray and feral cats. A feral cat is born and lives in the wild with little or no human contact. A stray cat is a domestic cat that has been abandoned or has strayed from home and become lost. A stray cat may be presently homeless but was once a pet that lived with humans.

  • When your cat is being treated for an illness, it is very important that you follow your veterinarian's advice and instructions precisely. Take your cat for re-examination if and when requested. If your cat's condition worsens unexpectedly, contact your veterinarian for advice.

  • Marijuana is not new, but it is the most popular illicit drug in the United States. Here's what IS new: with the legalization and decriminalization of the product, plus the availability of synthetic versions, marijuana toxicity in pets is on the rise.

  • Sedatives are prescription medications that should only be administered to healthy animals. If your cat's veterinary appointment is for a routine wellness examination, your veterinarian may prescribe a sedative if your cat's stress is severe.

  • The purpose of the microchips used for pets is to provide a form of permanent identification. These microchip implants are called RFID tags, (Radio Frequency Identification). They are tiny, virtually painless to implant, and dramatically increase the odds that a lost cat will be returned to his family.

  • Moving into a new residence may be one of the most stressful events in anyone's life. It is important that you prepare your cat prior to moving into a new home to reduce their anxiety and minimize the problems that can result. Cats are very territorial and may have problems accepting a new house as their home.

  • Neutering and castration are the common terms used to describe the surgical procedure known scientifically as orchidectomy or orchiectomy during which both testicles are removed in order to sterilize a male cat. Neutering is recommended to prevent urine marking and other territorial behavior including roaming and fighting with other cats that increases the risk of contracting disease. This procedure is recommended to be performed around 6 months of age when puberty is beginning. No adverse effects are noted following neutering; however it is important to remember that metabolism does decrease after the procedure, so diet will need to be adjusted accordingly to prevent inappropriate weight gain.

  • Obesity is the most common preventable disease in cats affecting up to 50% of the North American cat population. Obesity contributes to disease including diabetes, arthritis, hypertension, and cancer causing a decreased lifespan. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise plans. Regular visits to the veterinarian for body condition assessment and weight checks are crucial to weight loss as is maintaining the recommended dietary intake.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. It is one of the most common chronic diseases that affect cats. By some estimates, 90% of cats over 10 years of age are affected by OA.

  • Obesity is a very common problem in cats and leads to many health problems, including an increased risk of diabetes mellitus, heart disease and cancers of all types. Extra body fat causes increased inflammation in the body, worsening osteoarthritis. If there is already evidence of osteoarthritis, reducing inflammation and pain will help encourage your cat to become more active, which will speed up appropriate weight loss. Obesity can be prevented or reversed by being aware of calorie intake, body condition, and exercise.