Educational Articles

Cats + Medical Conditions

  • Gastritis is defined as inflammation of the lining of the stomach. The most common clinical signs associated with gastritis are sudden vomiting and decreased appetite (anorexia). Causes of acute gastritis include the ingestion of spoiled or raw food, non-food items such as garbage, foreign objects, plants, toxins, eating inappropriate foodstuffs such as table scraps or leftovers, or being fed large quantities of food. Treatment is based on the specific cause. Most acute cases resolve without medical intervention.

  • Gastroenteritis refers to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, meaning the stomach and the intestines. The principal treatment of gastroenteritis consists of rehydration and the restoration of blood electrolyte balance (sodium, potassium, and/or chloride). Most cases of acute gastroenteritis improve rapidly after rehydration. Early recognition and treatment are the cornerstones to returning your cat to his or her normal healthy state as quickly as possible.

  • Gingivitis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the gums. Gingivitis is the earliest phase of periodontal disease.

  • Glaucoma is a disease of the eye in which the pressure within the eye, called the intraocular pressure (IOP) is increased. Intraocular pressure is measured using an instrument called a tonometer.

  • Glomerulonephritis, also known as glomerular nephritis (GN), is a specific type of renal (kidney) disease characterized by inflammation of the glomeruli, which are the tiny structures in the kidneys that act as filters for the blood.

  • Heart disease is a serious medical condition in dogs, cats and humans. Heart disease can be divided into two general groups, congenital and adult onset forms. Cats do not normally develop arteriosclerosis or coronary artery disease, common diseases in humans.

  • A heart murmur is an abnormal heart sound, usually heard by listening to the heart with a stethoscope. Sometimes a murmur is determined to be 'innocent' or 'physiologic', while other times the murmur is determined to be pathologic or caused by disease.

  • Heartworms are a blood-borne parasite called Dirofilaria immitis that reside in the heart or adjacent large blood vessels of infected animals. Recent studies of cats with heart and respiratory diseases have found an incidence of heartworms that is far greater than previously thought. Veterinarians now strongly recommend that all cats receive year-round monthly heartworm preventives in areas where mosquitoes are active all year round.

  • It is estimated that 90% of cats over age 10 are affected by osteoarthritis, making it the most common chronic disease cats face. It is important to develop a plan with your veterinarian to help your cat maintain a good quality of life despite her arthritis. Arthritis management plans include weight loss, exercise, medications, diet, supplements, and modification of the home environment to ease your cat’s daily activities.

  • Ear hematomas are a collection of blood, either fresh or clotted, within the pinna. Excessive or violent shaking causes one or more blood vessels to break, resulting in bleeding into the space between the ear cartilage and skin on the inner surface of the ear. There is often an underlying cause which must be treated but additionally, surgery or drainage should be done to help relieve discomfort. Failure to treat will lead to a misshapen ear caused by damage from inflammation.